Strengthening Constitutional Self-Government

No Left Turns

The leader of the vast left-wing conspiracy?

Congressman Rahm Emmanuel, elected in 2002, with experience in the Clinton White House, is the "canary in the mineshaft," according to Eleanor Clift. He is, she says "an early-warning system that is unafraid to alert his party and the country to the dangers ahead." He is well positioned to do that. He is a "man in a hurry," and she notes his drive and discipline. Clift: "If there’s a vast left-wing conspiracy, Emanuel is its high priest and rabbi." While the article ends up moving away from Emmanuel, I get Clift’s point: She is looking for Democrats who are smart and engaged and ambitious, those who may be the future of the party. O.K. that’s fine, we have Rahm Emmanuel, and by everyone’s assertion, Barak Obama. Its’ a start. But Clift should keep looking.

Discussions - 10 Comments


Why are we so concerned about the future of the Democratic party? Maybe we should be trying to identify good Republican leaders instead.

Of course, you are right. That is even more important. Yet, I just can’t help taking delight in the Left Intellgentsia’s attempt to search for leaders. It seems so unnatural. Why not let some of these guys say and do something interesting, something that catches the imagination of someone, other than an anti-GOP shill. Let them do politics first. Everything leading up to the 2006 elections should prove revealing, for both sides (as will the outcome).


Yes, they would probably be wise not to enforce full ideological orthodoxy among their leaders. But I think their authoritarian impulses overcome them. The only apparent break from orthodoxy will probably come from Hillary, and it will be insincere.

We care about the Democratic Party because it is simply amazing. :) Or, at least, used to be . . . and definitely will be again. I hope . . .


A Democratic party that cannot forthrightly repudiate Michael Moore, indeed welcomes him at the highest levels, is rotten to the core.

The phrase "Sickness Unto Death" comes to mind. I mean moral death, not necessarily political.

You are wasting your time and energies, my friend. Wake up and smell the coffee.

NOOO!!! Hehe. Mr. Frisk, you’re being silly. The Democrats will survive. I’m just worried that they will not wield the power they once had. Eventually, reform will happen. I’m counting on it. Without the Democrats where would I turn? Certainly not the Republicans. :)



Your point on the moral death of my party grows more and more true everyday. I can only hope that the Left will realize this (or someone will point it out to them) and fix it. It truly is a shame. :(


Again, wake up and smell the coffee.
If reform will happen sooner or later, then what are you agonizing about? If the party is now dying morally, why do you want it to retain power?

Reread your last message carefully.
On the one hand, you concede that the Democratic party is headed toward "moral death." On the other hand, you worry that it will lose further "power." Also, while agreeing with me that the party is dying in a moral sense, you add that "reform" is inevitable.

What in God’s name are you saying, sir?

Mr. Frisk,



Yes. I should’ve made myself more clear. The Democratic Party is heading toward "moral death", but with reform it could turn around and gain its previous power. I am hoping reform is inevitable, because if it doesn’t happen, then the Democratic Party will die (and that will be bad for America :-D). That’s what I meant to say. I hope that was more clear.


Any true reform in the Democratic party would require clear, very public condemnation of many things that many of their leaders have said. As with the sailor testifying against his captain in the World War II novel "The Caine Mutiny," it may feel at first like you, or whoever, is punching his fist through glass.

Little of this has happened yet. Those who wish to try have my respect. But in general, I’ll believe it when
I see it.

The one thing that can save the Democrats now is reform. That is necessary. However, in my mind it is unlikely. Like David Frisk said, "Any true reform in the Democratic party would require clear, very public condemnation of many things that many of their leaders have said." The Democrats are not willing to do this. Sure, a select few individuals are. But the party as a whole entity? No. For the most part, they are not willing to admit the [obvious] need for change, if they are to survive.

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