Strengthening Constitutional Self-Government

No Left Turns

Booker T. Washington talks

I was navigating the web, as they say, and at Booker Rising I noticed that there was a link to the only recorded speech of Booker T. Washington. I had never heard his voice until now. Terrific. Link on this and give it a few seconds to load and you will hear Mr. Washington deliver the talk that made him as famous as Frederick Douglass had been (who died the year of the talk, 1895): the speech given at the Atlanta Exposition. Here is a transcription of the talk, so you can see it as you listen; it will make it easier to understand since the audio is imperfect by today’s standards (this was recorded in 1895!). If you are interested in what I have to say about Booker T. Washington (and the speech) see Jeff Sikkenga’s book, History of American Political Thought.

Discussions - 2 Comments

I wish all low income members of the democratic party would read this and understand how the democratic party has turned them into victocrats (thank you Larry Elder for that great word), dependent on the paltry entitlements lovingly bestowed upon them by the party, past of slaveholders, klansmen and Wilsonian apartheidists, and present of apologists, elitists and victocrats.

As John Edwards said "hope is on the way." Hope is always "on the way" from democrats. But it never arrives. As more and more people realize that welfare and entitlements perpetuate poverty, more and more people leave the party of the apologists and join the party of Jack Roosevelt Robinson, a great civil rights activist who happened to be a Hall of Fame baseball player.

BTW, Jackie Roosevelt Robinson was named after Theodore Roosevelt, the first President of the United States to invite a black man to dine at the White House. The invitee was the subject of your article, Booker T. Washington.

Proud Member of the Party of Lincoln

Thanks for highlighting my blog, Booker Rising. A clarification: the audio recording of Booker T. Washington’s voice was rerecorded in ***1903*** (not recorded in 1895). Folks had him reread a portion of his famous "Cast Down Your Bucket Where You Are" speech (aka the Atlanta Compromise speech) from 1895.

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