Strengthening Constitutional Self-Government

No Left Turns

No No Nanette

Last night, Chicago White Sox pitcher Mark Buehrle pitched a no-hitter against the Texas Rangers. Until a few years ago, Buehrle would have been credited with a perfect game because he faced the minimum number of batters (27). Sammy Sosa, who walked in the fifth inning, was picked off first. In the old way of accounting, Buehrle recorded 27 consecutive outs, thus a perfect game. Major League Baseball changed that interpretation, however, about 1990, and in doing so took off the books what had been the first combined perfect game, pitched in 1917.

That year, a promsing young Boston Red Sox pitcher walked the first batter against the Washington Nationals (Senators). He got into an argument with the umpire over ball four and was ejected from the game. (No word if the umpire was an ancestor of Joey Crawford.) He was relieved by Ernie Shore. The base runner was thrown out trying to steal second and Shore retired the next 26 batters. The two men were credited with a combined perfect game, since downgraded, if that’s the correct term, to a combined no hitter.

The young, hotheaded pitcher? He’s the answer to almost all obscure pitching trivia questions. Babe Ruth.

Discussions - 2 Comments

Dr. G:

A perfect game means nobody reaches first base.

Its just nice to know that left or right, we all can enjoy a good baseball game. Thanks for interjecting some much needed distraction into what has been a crazy news week.

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