Strengthening Constitutional Self-Government

No Left Turns

Faith and learning

This article summarizes a study (no time to try to track it down now) that suggests that, by itself, college attendance isn’t as inimical to faith as some have suggested. Perhaps; but the ways in which we’d have to qualify this general conclusion are many. I’d still say that anyone studying the humanities or social sciences at a prestigious secular institution had better be prepared to meet serious challenges to his or her faith. This may not be a bad thing, as long as those who are posing the challenges are fair-minded. But I’m not convinced that they all are. (To be sure, not all the "faithful" challengers of secular humanism are fair-minded and well-informed, but such folk are much easier to avoid behind the ivy-covered walls. Not so for the ill-informed challengers of religion, especially in the aforementioned disciplinary families.)

Discussions - 2 Comments

How odd, everything about me is backward. I grew up without faith but found it at State U, in a philosophy survey. The professor was very subtle in his approach but alerted me to the issue of objective, unchanging truth--is there or isn't there any? Just understanding that it was an open question seemed to be enough.

Twenty years later I met his wife and learned they were both quite conservative.

I should add to that an intellectual history course wherein I learned the fate of the many secular religions since the Enlightenment. Yes that was an epiphany too.

Almost certainly a time-waster. I doubt very much that studies can get at this kind of thing. Of course college undermines religiosity. As Peter Drucker once said: "look out the window."

Leave a Comment

* denotes a required field
 

No TrackBacks
TrackBack URL: http://nlt.ashbrook.org/movabletype/mt-tb.cgi/10646