Strengthening Constitutional Self-Government

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Boby Jindal, again

Jonathan Miles writes on Gov. Boby Jindal. The article is not meant to be favorable, in my view, yet it may be, even as itreveals some details about him that I hadn’t known. This guy is hard to dislike. I even like the way he talks about his political opponents. Last paragraph:

If Jindal, whether of his own accord or McCain’s, doesn’t end up on the Republican ticket, maybe this is the matchup to imagine: Bobby Jindal, the brown-skinned son of immigrants, running against another brown-skinned son of an immigrant, Barack Obama, in 2012. Jindal launches into the story of meeting Obama at the State of the Union speech in 2005, when the senator introduced himself to Jindal, then a congressman. “I know who you are,” Jindal replied. Immediately, Obama offered some flattering words. Jindal responded teasingly, “Yeah, but you won’t say that to the TV cameras.” “Yes I would,” the senator said, calling his bluff. “Why don’t you do a campaign commercial for me?” said Jindal, playing along. “He said ‘I’ll do it.’ You just can’t fake that kind of earnestness,” says Bobby Jindal, sounding awfully earnest himself.

Discussions - 4 Comments

DID Obama do a campaign commercial for Jindal? The article does not say.


Here's the thing:


Predictably, Jindal is brushing off the VP talk (“I’m sincere,” he says, “I’ve got the job that I want”), but his actions—flying to Los Angeles to appear on The Tonight Show, weekending with McCain and the other VP short-listees at McCain’s Arizona ranch—show he’s interested. Some say this is where his ambition may get the better of him. “If he wanted to destroy himself politically,” Mike Foster says, “he would take that job. The people of Louisiana would be extremely disappointed.” Sadow concurs, saying it would be “inconceivable” to him that Jindal would accept an invitation to run with McCain. “There hasn't been a losing VP candidate who's come back to win the presidency since 1920,” he says.

I wouldn't blame Louisianans for being angry. As much as I like Jindal, I really hope he does take the VP, for just those reasons. Eight years of a Jindal presidency looks awfully good. In all earnestness, I hope he waits for a better national candidacy.

Somebody needs to get a reminder to Lousianans, that the country comes before all else, {save those obligations to God, which run before}. Regardless of whatever problems currently plague and beset Lousiana, the demands of The United States come first and foremost.

And it's really that simple.

But I've little doubt they know that, it's just that they may be temporarily miffed, but upon reflection, I've no doubt of the commonsense and patriotism of Lousianans.

Of course Jindal will take advantage of the free media surrounding his possible VP selection, but he will not accept the offer.

I missed a "not" up there, as in, I hope he does NOT take the VP. I hope Jamie is right. If Jindal is as good as he appears to be, Louisiana will have a chance to give him up for the good of the country in a few more years.

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