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Turmoil in the Middle East and the Decline of al Qaeda

I recorded a podcast yesterday with David Tucker on the turmoil in the Middle East.  David is very smart on this stuff and he makes a number of interesting points, one of which is that the unrest in Egypt, Libya, and elsewhere is likely a sign that al Qaeda will lose more respect and power among Muslims in the coming months.  Of course all is in flux and it's impossible to make predictions on much of anything until the dust settles a bit, but I think this is a likely outcome under most scenarios.
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Discussions - 6 Comments

Iran's role? I look forward to listening in.

Al Qaeda is but the latest iteration of the phenomenon of jihadism within mohammadenism. Sure it's important to obliterate the leadership of this latest iteration, and sure it's important to obliterate as much as possible the rank and file thereof, ---------------- but the problem transcends Al Qaeda, and ALWAYS has transcended Al Qaeda.

And it hasn't the slightest thing to do with economics, or want of educational or economic opportunity throughout islam.

This is all about the jihadist impulse latent in the very heart of the message of their self-styled "prophet."

You can no more carve jihadism out of mohammadenism than you could carve pitching out of baseball.

And that's the gist of Ratzinger's critique at Regensburg, although he couched in language less direct. There were reasons he quoted the man he did, and the questions that man raised centuries ago, have not been answered to this day.

And what's more, they can't be answered.

Thank you for a quality post.

Jihadism grows out of an inherent Arabian narcissism & machismo. This religion taught its adherents that they would conquer and remake the world, but it never quite happened. Instead, they find themselves living on natural resources and tourism, light-years behind the West. Instead of accepting this and doing productive things to close the gap, many in that part of the world lash out, blaming us for their predicament. If you can't beat them, shoot them!

Unless these revolutions produce real progress, real civilizational accomplishment, I don't see how they will reduce jihadism in the long-term. The source of this violence is humiliation, and it is at that level that it must be addressed.

You know, the Germans and Japanese were arrogant like this, and it took a total war to sober them up. God help us.

You know, the Germans and Japanese were arrogant like this, and it took a total war to sober them up. God help us.


That is exactly what needs to happen. However, the bus driver is the White House is clueless as usual.

Yea, I'm aware of the notion that islam is but a platform for Arab supremacism, {however I don't really like using the term "islam" anymore, it's inaccurate, I much prefer the older term "mohammadenism"}.

I think Spencer over at Jihadwatch subscribes to the view that islam is a vehicle for Arab domination. He might consider that statement a bit strong though.

For my part, I don't think it's crucial to come down one way or the other on that issue.

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