Strengthening Constitutional Self-Government

No Left Turns

Iraqi Passions

This Washington Post article gives a good recounting of how the six military police officers were killed. It is not a pretty story. Most were killed at close range, after they ran out of ammunition. This attack on the Brits, I think, is noteworthy because it seems to be a different attack in kind compared to the ones on Americans around Baghdad. It seems to have been a situation where where hot tempers led to uncontrolled passions on the part of the Iraqis; no self-control, just the heat of anger controlling events. Reminds me of an urban riot in the States. This may reveal the difficulty of self-government in Iraq more than the other kinds of attacks do, which, after all, are really military in nature. This one reveals the habits and dispositions--the character--of the Iraqi people. Although I am not surprised by it, yet, it is shocking. Not a good sign.

Discussions - 3 Comments

This is a sad story. That said, I’m not sure how Schramm makes a connection between this clash and the ability of the Iraqi people to self-govern? As the article asserts, this assault was a result of the fuming tempers over foreign occupation.

I’m not saying that this mob was in the right, or even that it was motivated by reason (no mob ever is), but there is little doubt that the Iraqi people have been growing increasingly incensed with the foreign occupation of their land. Are we really surprised that things finally reached a boiling point?

But to get back to the mob for a second, how does this incident suggest that the Iraqi people are incapable of governing themselves? After all, I seem to recall some similar incidents in this country about 230 years ago, and we seemd to make out okay.

By the way, the news reports of this incident reminded me in many ways of the events in Mogadishu that were the basis for the book and film "Black Hawk Down."

I recently purchased the deluxe edition of Black Hawk Down. The first DVD contains a special commentary with some of the Task Force Ranger Veterans who fought in Mogadishu those two days in October 1993. It’s interesting to hear the men talk about what aspects of the film have been dramatized, what aspects are true-to-life, the fact that some of the characters in the film are composites of several people, etc... But what is really touching is to hear these men talk about some of their fallen comrades. One of the men tells a story about a soldier who was part of the team that was "ambushed" (I use that word in quotes, because the Task Force Rangers do not consider it an ambush), rode out on the Humvees, went back in that night, and came away without a scratch on him. He died the next day when he was hit by a round from a mortar. The DVD is both sad and inspiring, and I highly recommend it.

But to get back to the mob for a second, how does this incident suggest that the Iraqi people are incapable of governing themselves? After all, I seem to recall some similar incidents in this country about 230 years ago, and we seemd to make out okay.

Silly Matthew Little. Its ok when white people have mob rule. Its juts not ok when arabs do it.

I hope that clears it up for you.

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