Strengthening Constitutional Self-Government

No Left Turns

Thursday Thoughts

Over at The Corner, the NRO gang is rightly celebrating its magnificent 10th anniversary bash at Charlie Palmer steak house in DC last night. Huge crowd, good food (especially the mini-hamburgers, of which I ate a half dozen I think). The raucous crowd kept on buzzing and talking through the formal program, until Gov. Mitt Romney was invited to the microphone, where he performed an impressive feat: he managed to quiet the crowd so that he could be heard, and then he talked for about 45 seconds--exceedingly rare, but welcome, in a politician. He understands the principle that less is more, or, as Reagan used to say, always leave the audience wanting more. This man looks, and sounds, like a potential president. Keep your eye on him; I’m sure McCain is.

Not to be missed this week is John Lewis Gaddis in The New Republic, reviewing a new biography of Dean Acheson, but really looking at Bush and the present moment. Sample:

It’s strange, then, that so many Democrats today are outside this [Truman-Acheson] tradition. They have responded to the first Republican president to have become a liberal interventionist by quivering--and blogging--with rage. They have offered no plan for building on the Bush Doctrine and moving on. It’s as if they’re imitating the Republicans of the 1930s, who quivered with rage at Roosevelt (blogging had not been invented yet) while neglecting his warnings about tyrants, as well as his vision of what a world without them might be.

He concludes, "If Reagan and Bush could borrow from Truman and Acheson, then it’s hard to see why Democrats today should not borrow from Reagan and Bush." OMG--most liberals would catch the vapors at the very thought.   

Discussions - 2 Comments

Given the current state of affairs, most liberals I know now regard the Reagan-Bush I era with nostalgia. I imagine a lot of conservatives do as well.

There’s only one thing I don’t like about Romney; he didn’t stand up to his renegade and scofflaw Supreme Court. That scares me. He should have stayed compliance until the People could speak in a public amendment process.

Sooner or later, some executive is going to have to stand up for constitutional government and against Judicial Monarchy.

Leave a Comment

* denotes a required field
 

No TrackBacks
TrackBack URL: http://nlt.ashbrook.org/movabletype/mt-tb.cgi/9146